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Ride-A-Long with Orrin Holle



Posted: 6-17-17 Ride-A-Long with Orrin Holle

Western Kansas Corn Crew Representative, Kaitlin Donovan caught up with northwest Kansas corn farmer, Orrin Holle at the beginning of June. While riding along in the sprayer, the two talked about family farming, planting season and management practices among many other things. Check out parts of their conversations below.

Orrin has wanted to be farmer since he could eat dirt and his  parents have the picture to prove that one.  “It stirs something in me,” he says. “I want to be a farmer, I want to produce food and fuel for our world. We love what we do and produce the most safe food supply the world has ever seen, and that’s produced by American farmers and it’s just so great to be a part of that.”

Orrin says he’s “not in the business of growing weeds,” and that’s been the family motto for many generations. That’s why he’s out spraying his field. The abnormal amount of moisture received this spring is not only good for the corn growth but the weeds really like it as well. In the next video Orrin talks about what chemicals he’s spraying and why.

Orrin says he wants his consumers to know who produces their food. “We’re a family just like you are sitting at home eating these products,” he says. “I don’t produce anything on this farm that I wouldn’t feed my children. We’re out here everyday taking care of the land that has been provided for us. We’re trying to produce the most safe and affordable food supply that we can.”

He explains in this video clip how the chemical he sprays on the field never gets applied directly to the ears of corn because he strategically plans his application schedule for optimization.

Sprayers are very large pieces of equipment but it’s not just chemical in that tank on the back. In the next clip Orrin talks about what he’s applying and how much of the tank is actually water and how much is chemical.

Food is grown in many diverse ways. Orrin discusses how growing corn in fields using conventional farming methods is different from growing food in home gardens.

 

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